Reducing waste without compromising oral hygiene

It may be a controversial topic, but in this post I am going to explore ditching toothpaste and commercial toothbrushes and tooth floss.

It’s all things oral hygiene, and I think you may be surprised by some of my recommendations.

Firstly, and perhaps least controversially, is to share with you how easy it was to switch from plastic-handled to bamboo-handled toothbrushes.

I signed myself and my husband up with toothcrush, and we receive 2 bamboo-handled toothbrushes every 2 months. Since we don’t tend to replace our brushes quite that frequently, we will be able to stockpile them and delay re-subscription for next year to save a little money. However, it’s a fairly cheap service. We are paying under $50 for the year, which works out to 12 toothbrushes. Roughly $4.15 per toothbrush.

While pregnant I told my dentist that the mint toothpaste was making me feel really ill. His response was to brush with just water, and said the action of brushing is more important than using toothpaste. This has given me the confidence to ditch commercial toothpastes altogether in favour of a homemade product, which I can’t really call a ‘paste’. I used the recipe available on Biome Eco Store’s website, (with the addition of cinnamon essential oil for taste) and, while it’s slightly more effort to get the product onto the brush and then into the mouth, the relief at no longer using toothpaste tubes (not to mention the questionable ingredients in them) seems worth it.

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It doesn’t taste like much while brushing (personally I don’t find it bad at all, as the strongest flavours are salt – from the bicarb – and coconut) but when you rinse your mouth out with water you can taste the essential oils and stevia and personally I think it’s much tastier than bought toothpaste. The texture is what takes getting used to. You can feel the slight grittiness cleaning your teeth, but other than that it sort of feels like brushing with water. And it doesn’t foam up like a commercial toothpaste (but think of what they put in there to make it do so!), so if you have what I am beginning to realise is a fairly common quirk and can’t feel clean without a lather, this may not be for you.

Noosa Basics makes a charcoal and candelilla wax tooth floss, which works just as well as the commercial brands, but has the added bonus of being completely compostable. It also comes in a cardboard box – the only part of the packaging that proves slightly difficult to recycle is the metal cutter, but as per a previous post, you can put this in a tin with your metal bottle lids and recycle in your council’s recycling bin.

Okay, so most people’s oral hygiene routine probably ends there. I haven’t yet explored mouth wash, though a quick online search has yielded multiple options for a simple homemade variety (remember that commercial brands use alcohol which can contribute to mouth and throat cancer – though I would never dream of convincing you to give up drinking alcohol so maybe the amount in mouthwash is negligible when compared with my wine consumption). But I do think it’s worth sharing one last product with you, that could replace mouth wash. It’s called a tongue scraper, and no, it’s not painful or particularly gross.

Although I haven’t yet used mine enough to see whether it makes a difference, the reviews I’ve seen online indicate that it is helpful not only in mitigating bad breath but also in preventing sickness. If I manage to find the time while looking after my 2-month-old I will use it more regularly over winter and repost to tell you my personal opinion on its efficacy.

So there you have it! A complete introduction to reducing waste and unwanted chemicals when it comes to oral hygiene.

Live better.

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